Dakota Hernández’s exotic and feminine illustrations

Dakota Hernández’s exotic and feminine illustrations

Giulia Guido · 3 months ago · Art

Simple images in which nature and man live together in perfect balance. These are the illustrations of Dakota Hernández, stage name of Miriam García, a Spanish illustrator who creates works in which two subjects always dominate. 

The first is nature in all its forms, from immense landscapes with boundless lakes and plains to simple plants that catch the eye. The second undisputed protagonist of her works is the presence of female figures, nude portraits, without veils. This choice, to present the human being naked, without superstructures, reinforces the bond with the environment, giving us the feeling that it is there, in the middle of the green grass and the blue sky, the right place for him. 

Looking at Dakota Hernández’s illustrations you can breathe air of freedom, you can feel that atmosphere of relaxation and peace that you only get when you get lost in remote places, far from the chaos of the city and the hours of everyday life. Everything is so natural, everything is so perfect. 

This perfection, as well as being created by the subjects, is underlined by a wise one of colours, never too soft, but never too marked. The chromatic balance shows how the choice of the palette is a fundamental step for Dakota Hernández, which then inspires from the shapes of the bodies, their poses and natural elements. 

Below you can find a selection of her works, but to discover all of them go to the artist’s Instagram profile and to buy one of her creations visit her page on Etsy

Dakota Hernández’s exotic and feminine illustrations
Art
Dakota Hernández’s exotic and feminine illustrations
Dakota Hernández’s exotic and feminine illustrations
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Banksy invades London Underground with new artworks

Banksy invades London Underground with new artworks

Giulia Pacciardi · 3 months ago · Art

Disguised as what appears to be a sanitation worker, Banksy, or who for him, has struck again.
This time his stage is a London Underground wagon filled with rats, a symbol he uses to represent disorder and, usually, to criticize the European political and economic system.

As for all the artwork he has claimed recently, this time the protagonist is the Covid-19 and the controversy put in place by the artist seems to be directed to all those who refuse to wear the mask and not to put into practice the rules to avoid contagion.

The caption of the video that he has just published on Instagram to claim the artwork speaks clearly, “if you don’t mask, you don’t get“, but if it’s not enough to do the rest, his rats will take care of it.
One without the mask sneezes and expels the virus, the other one saves himself using it as a parachute, another one hides under it and the last one uses an alcoholic solution to clean it. 

For a wall of the stop and for the hatch of the same wagon, instead, he borrows the famous Chumbawamba song, Tubthumping but a little changed and adapted at the moment:

“I get lockdown, but I get up again”

View this post on Instagram

. . If you don’t mask – you don’t get.

A post shared by Banksy (@banksy) on

Banksy invades London Underground with new artworks
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Banksy invades London Underground with new artworks
Banksy invades London Underground with new artworks
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Jean Jullien’s sculptures for Le Voyage in Nantes

Jean Jullien’s sculptures for Le Voyage in Nantes

Emanuele D'Angelo · 3 months ago · Art

The characteristic scribbles of the French illustrator Jean Jullien come to life as sculptures at Le Jardin des Plantes in Nantes, France, as they float gently between the ponds and the large public garden.

The graphic designer from Nantes has decided to take part in the festival “Le Voyage“, creating four large installations in the botanical gardens, which are presented in the form of oversized figures and color-blocks drawn with his unique style of black lines.

In one section of the garden, the elongated, rubbery arms of three figures are stuck together embracing a grove of trees, while in another area a rake-handed character scrapes the earth.
Then we also find a nice pink character of eight meters long floats on his back in one of the ponds of the garden, bathing and spitting water. While on the opposite side an orange figure walks merrily through the gardens while its long locks of ivy tangles behind it.

Each sculpture is designed in the typically sketchy style of Jean Jullien, and is made of flat sheets of bent metal or polyurethane foam, covered with bright colours and outlined with black paint.

Jean Jullien’s sculptures for Le Voyage in Nantes
Art
Jean Jullien’s sculptures for Le Voyage in Nantes
Jean Jullien’s sculptures for Le Voyage in Nantes
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Jocelyn and her simple and delicate illustrations

Jocelyn and her simple and delicate illustrations

Giulia Guido · 3 months ago · Art

A few simple lines on soft, pastel-coloured backgrounds are the only elements Jocelyn needs to create her small masterpieces. 

Jocelyn, better known on Instagram as @joce_cova, is a young American artist who creates minimal and feminine style illustrations. At the center of her artistic research are emotions, moments of intimacy, the perception of the woman’s body, all themes treated with an unparalleled delicacy and purity. 

Jocelyn’s illustrations are so perfect and striking that they lend themselves to become manifestos of feminist struggles, or simply of feelings and moods that we cannot express in words. This is precisely why Jocelyn does not just create and on paper, but her illustrations also become stickers, pins and find space on T-shirts and sweatshirts, all of which can be purchased at her Etsy shop

We have selected our favorite illustrations, but to find out more visit her Instagram profile

Jocelyn and her simple and delicate illustrations
Art
Jocelyn and her simple and delicate illustrations
Jocelyn and her simple and delicate illustrations
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Tom Leighton, the charm of cities in the dark of night

Tom Leighton, the charm of cities in the dark of night

Giulia Guido · 3 months ago · Art, Photography

What happens in the streets of big cities when the sun goes down and darkness covers everything? What happens to crowded squares, offices, shops? Luckily for us there are those who at night, instead of resting and sleeping, leave home and, fascinated by the spectacle that comes to life when the lights go out, start taking pictures. Tom Leighton is an English artist, photographer and printmaker who has been travelling the world for years, from London to Hong Kong, in search of views and scenarios to photograph. 

Deeply fascinated by urban environments, Tom Leighton works almost always at night, photographing the deserted streets, the buildings that lose their purpose and become imposing monoliths, the luminous signs that seem suspended between the earth and the sky. 

Among his works, what captured our attention the most are the two photographic series taken in Tokyo. The Japanese capital has more than 9 million inhabitants, but in Tom Leighton’s shots it appears almost deserted, it seems to have been abandoned by everyone. 

So, without all those people crowding the city during the day, the photographer’s eye can rest on the details, the shapes of the buildings, the views, the symmetries, inviting us to rediscover these urban landscapes with him. 

“Leighton asks us to reconsider our cities, what they are and what they might become.”

We have selected only some of his photographs, but to discover all the projects of Tom Leighton visit his website, his Instagram profile and his Behance page. 

Tom Leighton, the charm of cities in the dark of night
Art
Tom Leighton, the charm of cities in the dark of night
Tom Leighton, the charm of cities in the dark of night
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